IS 590 – Problems in Information Sciences – Scholarly E-Publishing

My summer semester of 2013 includes a 3-credit hour course in Scholarly E-Publishing.  This course provides exposure to an international electronic publishing industry, particularly focused on journal and book publishing, from a world center of electronic scholarly publishing: London, United Kingdom. It offers an intensive series of talks, site visits, and instruction designed to explore how e-publishing is changing both the way scholarly research is conducted and communicated.  Information professionals from Oxford, Cambridge, the British Library, Elsevier, Wiley,  Proquest and more share their unique perspective on scholarly publishing.

Because scientific effort must be clearly communicated and disseminated via scholarly publishing, the course content is of particular interest to the University of Tennessee “SciData” program and is highly relevant to my professional and scholarly goals.  I am particularly interested in understanding how publishers intend to work with open access data repositories such as DataONE, Dryad, or spatial data repositories such as ShareGeo in the UK or EDAC in the U.S.  I am interested in the concept of the data paper, and how a dataset and a data paper might be linked to a publication and shared across platforms with the scholarly community.

The course is a joint venture of University College London Department of Information Studies, the Pratt Institute School of Information and Library Studies in New York City, and the School of Information Sciences at the University of Tennessee.

Given my background in natural sciences (B.S., Ecology and Evolutionary Biology) and entry into the UT School of Information Sciences 2013 cohort concurrently with the 8 SciData Scholars, I was allowed the opportunity to participate in the course.

Along with a blog of reflections on daily course material and the London experience, the course culminates in an individualized research paper.  I intend to focus on the role of data and datasets in scholarly publishing.  The role of datasets in scholarly publishing is most pertinent to my work with the DataONE project concerned with accessibility and preservation of environmental data.

For more on the course, follow the tags “INSC 590 – E-Publishing” or view the syllabus online (SU13-IS590-E-publishing, PDF). The Course Syllabus is also available as a .doc format <http://scidata.sis.utk.edu/sites/all/files/590%20SyllabusTenopir2013.doc>.

 

 

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About Tanner Jessel

I am a recent M.S. in Information Science graduate from the University of Tennessee School of Information Science. I was formerly a graduate research assistant funded by DataONE (Data Observation Network for Earth). Prior, I worked for four years as a content lead and biodiversity scientist with the U.S. Geological Survey's Biodiversity Informatics Program. Building on my work experience in biodiversity and environmental informatics, my work with DataONE focused on exploring the nature of scientific collaborations necessary for scientific inquiry. I also conducted research concerning user experience and usability, and assisted in development of member nodes with an emphasis on spatial data and infrastructure. I assisted with research designed to understand sociocultural issues within collaborative research communities. Through August 1, 2014, I was based at the Center for Information and Communication Studies at the University of Tennessee School of Information Science in Knoxville, Tennessee.

Posted on June 25, 2013, in London Experience and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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