Statistics for Data Science

Today’s lecture for Big Data Analytics included statistical tools for data analysis.

My Data Pro Tumble blog includes several listings and resources concerning statistics <http://mountainsol.tumblr.com/tagged/statistics>.

From the perspective of an information scientist, statistical analysis software is not just the computation done, but preservation of both the input, output, and processing.

One of the more popular statistical software packages is R, which actually does a lot more than work with statistics (as one of my recent tweets showed):

There’s a short introduction to R which explains:

R is a tool for statistics and data modeling. The R programming language is elegant, versatile, and has a highly expressive syntax designed around working with data. R is more than that, though — it also includes extremely powerful graphics capabilities. If you want to easily manipulate your data and present it in compelling ways, R is the tool for you.

http://tryr.codeschool.com/

It’s also possible to run R from the terminal in Mac OS X, but a nice interface for using R is R Studio <https://www.rstudio.com/>.

Other useful links:

http://ropensci.org/

http://cran.us.r-project.org/

http://www.statmethods.net/index.html

 

 

Advertisements

About Tanner Jessel

I am a recent M.S. in Information Science graduate from the University of Tennessee School of Information Science. I was formerly a graduate research assistant funded by DataONE (Data Observation Network for Earth). Prior, I worked for four years as a content lead and biodiversity scientist with the U.S. Geological Survey's Biodiversity Informatics Program. Building on my work experience in biodiversity and environmental informatics, my work with DataONE focused on exploring the nature of scientific collaborations necessary for scientific inquiry. I also conducted research concerning user experience and usability, and assisted in development of member nodes with an emphasis on spatial data and infrastructure. I assisted with research designed to understand sociocultural issues within collaborative research communities. Through August 1, 2014, I was based at the Center for Information and Communication Studies at the University of Tennessee School of Information Science in Knoxville, Tennessee.

Posted on February 27, 2014, in Big Data Analytics, Coursework and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: