Eastern Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) model on PC versus Supercomputer

I recently ran a model of Hemlock on my personal computer.

I modeled ~489 records; the Nautilus model used over 2,000.

From the model output:

This is a representation of the Maxent model for Tsuga_canadensis. Warmer colors show areas with better predicted conditions. White dots show the presence locations used for training, while violet dots show test locations.

 

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This is not really a fair comparison, but the difference between the models with 489 records and 2000+ is interesting for comparing the predictions.

EECS model for Eastern hemlock is different.  It uses more data, and it was run 20 times with 10% of the records reserved before being synthesized into one image.

I will post some additional comparisons for other trees in some later posts.

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About Tanner Jessel

I am a recent M.S. in Information Science graduate from the University of Tennessee School of Information Science. I was formerly a graduate research assistant funded by DataONE (Data Observation Network for Earth). Prior, I worked for four years as a content lead and biodiversity scientist with the U.S. Geological Survey's Biodiversity Informatics Program. Building on my work experience in biodiversity and environmental informatics, my work with DataONE focused on exploring the nature of scientific collaborations necessary for scientific inquiry. I also conducted research concerning user experience and usability, and assisted in development of member nodes with an emphasis on spatial data and infrastructure. I assisted with research designed to understand sociocultural issues within collaborative research communities. Through August 1, 2014, I was based at the Center for Information and Communication Studies at the University of Tennessee School of Information Science in Knoxville, Tennessee.

Posted on April 3, 2014, in Civic Life, Coursework, Practicum, Research and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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