Options for Open Source, Public Access for ATBI Data

When I worked for the NBII we used Rackspace and Amazon’s cloud service, along with MySQL for the “Species of Greatest Conservation Need” database that held a similar number of species, but no spatial data.
Since your data has a spatial component, something like PostgreSQL or SQLite might be worthwhile to look at. I took a class in environmental information management last summer and was introduced to SQLite – which apparently has some advantages over databases created with Access, including native support for GIS applications like GRASS and QGIS.
SQLite works with a CMS called Django, Scott Simmerman suggested I look at that for improvements on the ATBI mapping project’s Web interface.  There some free hosting services for small or dev projects:https://wiki.python.org/moin/FreeHosts Might be worthwhile to look at that. Another “free” hosting site here: https://www.pythonanywhere.com
Finally Tom Colson mentioned something he’s working on with GSMIT – the Otter Spotter. Tom said Google Earth Engine might be worthwhile looking at for that.  Google offers grants and hosting of data for non-profits to use Earth Engine, so I’m curious how much of the ATBI database data might be translatable to KML.
When I worked for the NBII I was interested in serving up spatial data in KML files – I like them because you can open KML in robust GIS packages along with popular virtual globe tools like Google Earth or ArcGIS Explorer – things the everyday person has access to.
Even if not all the data can translate, it’s another “view” of the ATBI data that’s pretty useful for outreach, if not doing actual science.
I will explore at this issue as I have time and hopefully help as I am able.  I am a student of RDBMS and the ATBI is one of the more interesting datasets to learn with.
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About Tanner Jessel

I am a recent M.S. in Information Science graduate from the University of Tennessee School of Information Science. I was formerly a graduate research assistant funded by DataONE (Data Observation Network for Earth). Prior, I worked for four years as a content lead and biodiversity scientist with the U.S. Geological Survey's Biodiversity Informatics Program. Building on my work experience in biodiversity and environmental informatics, my work with DataONE focused on exploring the nature of scientific collaborations necessary for scientific inquiry. I also conducted research concerning user experience and usability, and assisted in development of member nodes with an emphasis on spatial data and infrastructure. I assisted with research designed to understand sociocultural issues within collaborative research communities. Through August 1, 2014, I was based at the Center for Information and Communication Studies at the University of Tennessee School of Information Science in Knoxville, Tennessee.

Posted on April 23, 2014, in Coursework, Practicum and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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