Monthly Archives: May 2014

UT-Knoxville School of Information Sciences Course Options (2013-2014)

Sometimes I am critical of the  courses offered through my graduate program.
In truth, there is a decent balance of specialty coursework serving a diverse range of career paths for information professionals in-training.
I found this list of course offerings on the 2013 – 2014 graduate catalog for the College of Communication and Information.  I thought it’d be worthwhile to preserve them as a record of options I’ve had to choose from.
•  INSC 450 – Writing About Science and Medicine
•  INSC 500 – Thesis
•  INSC 502 – Registration for Use of Facilities
•  INSC 504 – Research Methods in Information Sciences
•  INSC 505 – ePortfolio
•  INSC 510 – Information Environment
•  INSC 520 – Information Representation and Organization
•  INSC 521 – Cataloging and Classification
•  INSC 522 – Cataloging of Non-print Materials
•  INSC 523 – Abstracting and Indexing
•  INSC 530 – Information Access and Retrieval
•  INSC 531 – Sources and Services for the Social Sciences
•  INSC 532 – Sources and Services for Science and Engineering
•  INSC 533 – Sources and Services for the Humanities
•  INSC 534 – Government Information Sources
•  INSC 535 – Advanced Information Retrieval
•  INSC 541 – Knowledge Management for Information Professionals
•  INSC 542 – Social Informatics
•  INSC 544 – Business Intelligence for Information Professionals
•  INSC 545 – Scientific and Technical Communications
•  INSC 546 – Environmental Informatics
•  INSC 547 – Health Sciences Information Centers
•  INSC 548 – Federal Libraries and Information Centers
•  INSC 550 – Management of Information Organizations
•  INSC 551 – School Library Media Centers
•  INSC 552 – Academic Libraries
•  INSC 553 – Specialized Information Agencies and Services
•  INSC 554 – Public Library Management and Services
•  INSC 557 – User Instruction
•  INSC 559 – Grant Development for Information Professionals
•  INSC 560 – Development and Management of Collections
•  INSC 564 – Archives and Records Management
•  INSC 565 – Digital Libraries
•  INSC 571 – Resources and Services for Children
•  INSC 572 – Resources and Services for Young Adults
•  INSC 573 – Programming for Children and Young Adults
•  INSC 574 – Resources and Services for Adults
•  INSC 575 – Valuing Diversity: International and Intercultural Resources for Youth
•  INSC 576 – Storytelling in Libraries and Classrooms
•  INSC 577 – Picture Books Across the Curriculum
•  INSC 581 – Information Networking Applications
•  INSC 582 – Information Systems Design and Implementation
•  INSC 584 – Database Management Systems
•  INSC 585 – Information Technologies
•  INSC 587 – Mining the Web
•  INSC 588 – Human-Computer Interaction
•  INSC 590 – Problems in Information Sciences
•  INSC 591 – Independent Project or Research
•  INSC 592 – Big Data Analytics
•  INSC 594 – Graduate Research Participation
•  INSC 595 – Student Teaching in School Library Information Center
•  INSC 596 – Field-Based Experience in School Library Information Centers
•  INSC 597 – Information Architecture
•  INSC 598 – Web Design
•  INSC 599 – Practicum
•  INSC 680 – Information Science Theory
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Criteria for Bike Lanes?

Hi Jerry,

Jon Livengood has proven a very helpful resource for understanding some of the things related to bike and pedestrian access.

Always sends very detailed, thoughtful messages.

​With Washington being re-paved I asked for advice about how to propose street marking options and he had some insights.

He shared what city planners look for – one item of interest is pedestrian density. He suggested coming up with a few ideas he could evaluate.

I am not sure how we’d quantify that Washington has a high density of pedestrian traffic, but it seems to me like Olive and Washington has a fairly high rate of street crossing, and I’ve seen a schoolbus let children off there.

Another location might be the Church on Washington, or connecting the businesses at Winona and Washington.

I often see people crossing from John T. O’Conner to the ballpark.

And finally, a connection from the neighborhood (Woodbine or Jefferson) to Ashley Nichole.​

This might be naive but I was hoping crosswalks would remind drivers that it’s a residential area.

At the very least, it would be helpful for dog owners with black dogs who enjoy walking their pets in the evening (selfish motivation).

Anyway I’m sure other Parkridge people will have ideas. Maybe collect them and have an in-person conversation with Jon on May 21, at the planning meeting you posted?

-Tanner