GIS404 Remote Sensing – Module 2 – Aerial Photography Basics & Visual Interpretation of Aerial Photography

Building off of the overview of remote sensing and history of aerial photograph provided in Module 1, we will now learn more about the types of and techniques for interpreting aerial photography. Modules 3 and 4 will continue to focus on the use of aerial photography but expand on the material covered in the first two modules.

The first slideshow (Lecture 2a: Aerial Photography basics) provides background on the types of aerial cameras, the different types of images they capture (oblique, vertical, stereo), the types of film used by traditional cameras, and understand how resolution (spatial, spectral, temporal) applies to aerial photography. This lecture (and Chapter 4) provides students the background material that form the foundation for understanding how to use aerial photos. The second slideshow (Lecture 2b: Aerial Photo Interpretation) goes into detail about the concepts, techniques, and application of visually interpreting aerial photos. Students will learn about the methods and techniques used to visually interpret aerial photos (i.e. recognition elements). These techniques form the basis for deriving geographic features and/or land use land cover types from aerial photos (which we will do in the next lab) and that are used in a wide variety of real world applications. This lecture (and Chapter 5) provide students an overview on the concepts and techniques of visual interpretation that will be applied in this week’s lab.

In the laboratory exercise, you will learn some basic principles of interpreting features found on aerial photographs. These principles range from concepts so basic that you might never have considered them, to quite obvious ideas, and finally some more advanced techniques.

Module 2 Topics

Topics covered in module 2, include:

1. Aerial Photography Basics

  • Types of Cameras
  • Types of Film
  • Types of Products

2. Basics of Visual (i.e. manual) Interpretation

  • Recognition Elements: 
    • shape, color, size, texture, pattern, shadow
    • Site and Association
  • Examples of Applications of Remote Sensing 
  • Forestry Interpretation Case Study
  • Sources for Aerial Photography

Module 2 Student Learning Outcomes

When you complete this module, you should be able to:

  • Recall the major types of aerial photos/cameras
  • Recall the types of films, resolution and products generally produced from aerial photos
  • Recall case study examples of the visual interpretation of aerial photos
  • Recall how to use various recognition elements to visually interpret aerial photographs

By the end of this lab, you should be able to:

  • Interpret the tone and texture of aerial photographs
  • Identify land features in an aerial photograph based on several visual attributes
  • Compare similar land features in true color and false color infrared (IR) photographs
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About Tanner Jessel

I am a recent M.S. in Information Science graduate from the University of Tennessee School of Information Science. I was formerly a graduate research assistant funded by DataONE (Data Observation Network for Earth). Prior, I worked for four years as a content lead and biodiversity scientist with the U.S. Geological Survey's Biodiversity Informatics Program. Building on my work experience in biodiversity and environmental informatics, my work with DataONE focused on exploring the nature of scientific collaborations necessary for scientific inquiry. I also conducted research concerning user experience and usability, and assisted in development of member nodes with an emphasis on spatial data and infrastructure. I assisted with research designed to understand sociocultural issues within collaborative research communities. Through August 1, 2014, I was based at the Center for Information and Communication Studies at the University of Tennessee School of Information Science in Knoxville, Tennessee.

Posted on September 8, 2014, in Coursework and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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