Monthly Archives: February 2015

Alumni Complaints

Hi Chris,

Thanks for your latest message in August 2013 concerning the historic properties on White Avenue.

I am proud to say that since we last exchanged e-mails, I’m not only a two-time alumni now, (B.S. 2006, M.S. 2014), but also an employee at the UT Institute of Agriculture.

While I’m proud to wear UT Orange, the University’s plans to move forward with a science building that demolishes historic properties in a nationally registered historic district is something that brings me shame.

Without exaggeration, every alumni I have spoken with on the topic is also ashamed of this plan:

Alumni here in Knoxville;

Alumni across the U.S.;

Alumni around the globe.

We simply expect more of our University.

Perhaps what is worse is that no amount of protest seems to affect the University’s plan to demolish the historic White Avenue properties.

This contradicts Volunteer values: no new construction project is worth sacrificing our history or our traditions to.

I’m also concerned about a new facility impeding the view of both The Hill and Hoskins Library’s unique architecture.

When I imagined college, I always imagined a park-like setting like The Hill.

As the campus has grown, Cumberland and The Hill has quickly become a "brick canyon."

Is that really the aesthetic we want for our University?

Are you not concerned that future top recruits to Tennessee will take note the lack of green space, in contrast with other Southern universities?

If you absolutely MUST have a science building at that location, rather than building at the current Biology Annex and Neyland Garage, please change the design to allow the historic homes to be preserved, and maximize green space.

UT has already destroyed much of the area’s history – Aconda court, Circle Park, the home at the Baker Center.

See attached photo of campus. You can see two of the homes "in the way" of the new science building in the upper right hand corner.

What’s three more historic homes to the bulldozer?

It’s a lot, actually.

Because it erodes our values as Tennessee Volunteers.

Current, past and future Volunteers believe in coexisting.

Not dominating.

Not predation.

Not razing history.

Respect for tradition and history is a core value at University of Tennessee at Knoxville.

Please respect Volunteer values and University traditions and change course on the planned science building.

Thanks,

Tanner

On Tue, Aug 27, 2013 at 7:04 PM, Cimino, Chris <cimino> wrote:

The bridge work required state approval which we have now have. Design work is taking place and we are now working to schedule the work. It will require lane closures so we are having to seek all the appropriate approvals and plan the work.

I will have the recessed lighting looked at. We do have folks looking at items around campus. We have tens of millions in deferred maintenance and limited resources. We will continue to do our best at staying on top of things.

Thanks for your interest and input.

Chris

On Aug 27, 2013, at 12:42 PM, "Tanner Jessel" <mountainsol> wrote:

Hi Chris,

I see the masonry is being fixed. Thats great.

However, the pedestrian bridge across Cumberland is still rusting and looks awful.

The pedestrian bridge itself has a severe uplifted crack that is a tripping hazard.

The recessed lighting on the amphitheater steps / walkway between Humanities Plaza and Hodges is still broken / looking shabby.

I think it’d be worth having someone walk around and take note of problems on campus like this.

And finally, I noticed this and want to reiterate that I oppose destroying historic elements of the neighborhood that defines the UT community:

http://www.knoxnews.com/news/2013/aug/27/ut-begins-buying-victorians-houses-to-make-way/

I have heard the argument that you need space. If you need space that badly you should not have given Hoskins to ROTC or Stokely to the Athletic Department.

Academic buildings are a dime a dozen. Historic structures that tell the story of a campus and community are irreplaceable. Please alter course on your plans.

-Tanner

On Wed, Dec 19, 2012 at 1:03 PM, Tanner Jessel <mountainsol> wrote:

Thanks for letting me know.

Also just to clarify I was looking at the bridge between the parking garage / campus police station and the Hill.

-Tanner

On Wed, Dec 19, 2012 at 12:56 PM, Cimino, Chris <cimino> wrote:

Thank you for bringing to my attention. We will have this looked at immediately.

Chris

On Dec 19, 2012, at 12:41 PM, Tanner Jessel <mountainsol>
wrote:

Hi Chris,

I was walking up Cumberland yesterday and noticed two things that might be problems for the University.

First, the pedestrian bridge across Cumberland has extensive oxidation on load bearing members of the structure, especially at the joints. As a point of pride I’d like to see those joints looking nice, not to mention safety reasons.

Second, on the retaining wall along the sidewalk adjacent to Cumberland Avenue in front of Hoskins Library, the brick fascia has annealed from the cinder block masonry. I’m not a mason but at the angle it’s leaning out, I’m worried it could peel away and crush someone walking on the sidewalk.

Thanks,

Tanner

On Wed, Jun 27, 2012 at 7:15 AM, Cimino, Chris <cimino> wrote:

Mr. Jessel,

Please feel free to submit your concerns directly to my attention.

Allow me to provide some background information to the recent article in the Metro Pulse.

The university has not begun any official "paperwork" or process to acquire or demolish the three properties. However, the site is in our 2011 Master Plan for a new class/laboratory building and we have been having some preliminary discussions with neighborhood representatives.

We did not agree to abandon the site in the 2011 Master Plan. There are two additional blocks north of the Jessie Harris building that were originally in the plan but after discussions with the Fort Sanders representatives, UT administration decided to alter the boundaries so as not to include those two blocks for this Master Plan. This had no impact on the block with these three properties which was shown in our natural boundaries and institutional zone in the 1994 Master Plan.

We feel we have a good relationship with representatives of the Fort Sanders community and have kept them abreast of our master planning throughout the process and even met with them two weeks ago on this very topic. We solicited input from them and discussed several options, including the relocation of the homes. We also have a great relationship with the Knoxville Police Department and have provided many resources to making Fort Sanders a safe community for everyone living there, not just our students.

As for our intentions, we are severely short in research and classroom space and are building in the core of campus and looking at all alternatives when selecting sites for new buildings. When possible we are renovating existing space and building additions. In the case of 13th and Cumberland, that site was selected for a much needed classroom/laboratory building. We are currently programming the space, and as we promised the Fort Sanders representatives, will be coming back to them with more specifics on the estimated footprint and potential impact on the three homes.

Regards,

Chris Cimino
University of Tennessee
Vice Chancellor for Finance & Administration
417 Andy Holt Tower
Knoxville, TN 37996-0141
cimino
865.974.4204 (office)
865.974.8131 (fax)

On Jun 26, 2012, at 9:20 AM, UTK Alumni Affairs wrote:

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IBSS Progress Pages

Thanks for the kind words.

I agree we should provide access to more information for each of the highlighted items.

Originally, I was thinking about using a hyperlink to launch an advanced search of the site.

Example – this link for the "Biomass Procurement" certification launches an "advanced search" that yields 13 results:

http://www.se-ibss.org/search?SearchableText=Biomass+Procurement&Title=&Subject_usage%3Aignore_empty=&Description=&created%3Alist%3Adate=1970%2F02%2F01&created_usage=range%3Amin&portal_type%3Alist=featuredStory&portal_type%3Alist=newsletter&portal_type%3Alist=poster&portal_type%3Alist=pressRelease&portal_type%3Alist=publication&Creator=&submit=Search

Notice that this creates different results from a simple search that someone might enter in the "search site" field on the SE-IBSS site, which yields 22 results:

http://www.se-ibss.org/search?SearchableText=Biomass+Procurement

I like this approach because in the first example (advanced search) we give the user multiple relevant results from across the site.

As I continue to add descriptive metadata to resources on the site, the relevancy of the results will continue to increase.

However, as you mention, we could link to specific articles.

I’m not really a big fan of that because over time links change and the user might be missing something else they are interested in (meaning they might be interested in any of the 13+ matches for their query on "biomass procurement specialist."

But, there are some advantages.

By providing a direct link to a specific article or page, we can choose the user’s experience.

Continuing with the "biomass procurement" example, here are four items retrieved from "biomass procurement" advanced search:

  1. http://www.se-ibss.org/publications-and-patents/learning-materials/Course%20outline.pdf/view?searchterm=Biomass%20Procurement
  2. http://www.se-ibss.org/publications-and-patents/presentations/certified-biomass-procurement-specialist/?searchterm=Biomass%20Procurement
  3. http://www.se-ibss.org/news-events/press-releases/certified-biomass-procurement-specialist-program/?searchterm=Biomass%20Procurement
  4. http://www.se-ibss.org/news-events/featured-stories/new-online-certification-course-biomass-procurement-specialist-in-srwc/?searchterm=Biomass%20Procurement

It begs the question: which one would we want to highlight?

For the immediate term, the easiest thing to do is to link all of the highlights to an "advanced search," with the understanding that we will have less control over the message.

I do see the merit in creating an individual article to synthesize and expand on each "bullet point." That will take more time.

There are a few ideas in favor and against adding individual pages for each bulleted item that we should consider carefully.

For now though, I think the most expedient solution to providing access to more information about each bulleted item is to link to advanced search tools.

Thanks,

Tanner

IBSS Progress Pages

Hi Jessica,

I am concerned the available handouts are too technical for a general audience.

Further, I also feel the handouts available do not encompass all IBSS feedstock production accomplishments.

My feeling is the "Progress" page should highlight all IBSS accomplishments concerning feedstock production & logistics.

Therefore, I have designed the page as a "resume" of sorts to reflect on IBSS Feedstock Production & Logistics milestones and accomplishments.

Check it out here:

http://www.se-ibss.org/progress/feedstock-production-and-logistics

I went through the previous years’ accomplishment report to pull out text concerning feedstock production & logistics research:

http://www.reeis.usda.gov/web/crisprojectpages/0225502-southeast-partnership-for-integrated-biomass-supply-systems.html

A couple things to note:

First, the photo you see is linked to our IBSS Flickr page.

Specifically, it is linked to our IBSS Flickr Album concerning Feedstock Production & Logistics. This is one of the main reasons why I set up our photo albums to mirror the progress areas listed on the IBSS site.

Second: note that on the right hand side, there is a continually updated feed of citations from our IBSS Zotero account.

These citations reference publications from our Zotero account in the collection (folder) "Feedstock Production & Logistics," available online at <https://www.zotero.org/ibss6/items/collectionKey/AKPMGJKC>.

The way I determined if a citation belonged in the collection is by selecting citations tagged (using a keyphrase extraction algorithm, WEKA as part of earlier work creating Zotero citations) with the following keywords from the USDA Agricultural Vocabulary Thesaurus:

  • Logistics
  • Transportation
  • Production
  • Efficiency
  • Supply Chain

Currently, only journal article publications are listed.

However, I expect that to change as we add additional items such as fact sheets, handouts, etc.

That brings me to the two items you have sent as possible content.

While I think they are too technical for a general audience, I do think they should be included on the Feedstock Production & Logistics Page.

My expectation is to make these materials available on the "publications" section of the site, and then create citations for them with Zotero.

Once in Zotero, these items can be added to the "Feedstock Production and Logistics" collection, which will make them show up at the top of the RSS feed on the right of the "Feedstock Production and Logistics" progress page.

The same scenario is possible for other items, such as videos related to feedstock production, like those on YouTube. This is why I asked Daniel about the technical feasibility of adding additional RSS modules on the Progress pages.

If you could have a look at the page, please me know if you have any questions, suggestions, or other input.

My plan is to continue this method for the remaining "Progress" pages, with a goal of populating them all by Friday.

Thanks,

Tanner

Tanner M. Jessel
Information Technology Specialist
Center for Renewable Carbon

renewablecarbon.tennessee.edu

The University of Tennessee
Institute of Agriculture
Center for Renewable Carbon
Mail: 2506 Jacob Drive
865-946-1162 (o)
865-946-1109 (f)
tjessel@utk.edu

SGA DOE: Argonne scientists slam study linking bioenergy, food scarcity — Tuesday, February 17, 2015 — www.eenews.net

From: Jessel, Tanner Monroe

Sent: Wednesday, February 18, 2015 9:04 AM
To: Leslie Boby
Subject: Re: [SGA] DOE: Argonne scientists slam study linking bioenergy, food scarcity — Tuesday, February 17, 2015 — http://www.eenews.net

​​Not really, what it is is a citation management tool similar to EndNote.

So, it does not store a physical copy of a document, it just assists in creating and stores the bibliographic information that would allow you (or other interested parties) to find the cited material at a later time.

You can create tags and folders and collections.

For example:

All IBSS6 publications (that I’ve created a record for):

https://www.zotero.org/ibss6/items

Subset of full collection: journal articles

https://www.zotero.org/ibss6/items/collectionKey/4HQNA7HP

Subset of journal article collection: 2014 journal articles

https://www.zotero.org/ibss6/items/collectionKey/3UEID4M4

Thematic collection: Items tagged with "Panicum virgatum."

https://www.zotero.org/ibss6/items/tag/Panicum%20virgatum

I do think you can "attach" documents such as journal article PDFs.

Since it is a citation, zotero is useful for "non traditional" sources like Web pages.

-Tanner

Tanner M. Jessel
Information Technology Specialist
Center for Renewable Carbon

renewablecarbon.tennessee.edu

The University of Tennessee
Institute of Agriculture
Center for Renewable Carbon
Mail: 2506 Jacob Drive
865-946-1162 (o)
865-946-1109 (f)
tjessel@utk.edu

IBSS colors- RGB?

Hi Leslie,

No, I don’t have those numbers;

However, here’s a tool where you could come reasonably close to whatever they are.

Basically enter the web page or url to the image you want to match, load it, and then click on the specific color you want with the cross hairs.

http://imagecolorpicker.com/en

Example image:

http://www.se-ibss.org/ibss.png

-Tanner

Tanner M. Jessel
Information Technology Specialist
Center for Renewable Carbon

renewablecarbon.tennessee.edu

The University of Tennessee
Institute of Agriculture
Center for Renewable Carbon
Mail: 2506 Jacob Drive
865-946-1162 (o)
865-946-1109 (f)
tjessel@utk.edu

Literature for IBSS project

Hey there Leslie,

Just wondering if you’d had a chance to look into Daniel’s availability to tweak the existing SE-IBSS.org Plone site’s RSS portlet template to offer a few different features including support for item description, suppressing display of the date syndicated, and opening the linked feed item in a new window instead of the current window.

Along with consuming externally sourced content via RSS feeds, I’m interested in using the internal "Advanced Search" feature of the SE-IBSS Plone site paired with the "continuously updated RSS feed" to serve up useful combinations of material.

For example – a search on Switchgrass using the plant’s Latin name, as shown here: "http://www.se-ibss.org/search_rss?SearchableText=Panicum+virgatum"

Thanks,

Tanner

Tanner M. Jessel
Information Technology Specialist
Center for Renewable Carbon

renewablecarbon.tennessee.edu

The University of Tennessee
Institute of Agriculture
Center for Renewable Carbon
Mail: 2506 Jacob Drive
865-946-1162 (o)
865-946-1109 (f)
tjessel@utk.edu

Work on Biomass Misconceptions?

Hi Leslie,

On the last call, we discussed the #BiomassWins hashtag, which led to consensus that we should have a social media centric discussion at the next meeting in March.

I actually volunteered to spearhead that discussion using whatever I learn from a social media workshop I’m helping put together for Southeast Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation, where I volunteer as webmaster and communications co-chair.

I suppose volunteering to facilitate a joint AFRI-CAP discussion entails cobbling together a draft agenda fashioned after what I’ve seen sent out before.

This "Biomass Myths" problem might be one facet of that conversation, since misconceptions often spread on social media, and can be refuted on social media. Memes are also largely intended for dispersal on social media, so there’s a solid connection.

And I agree about working collaboratively – Iowa switchgrass is the same as Tennessee switchgrass, same for the forest residue between Co. and Ga., – so we’re all facing the same information delivery challenges.

How about Monday at 1 PM?

Any other day or time is fine too – my thinking is Monday afternoon can be a drag, so a phone call might be a good antidote.

Thanks,

Tanner

Tanner M. Jessel
Information Technology Specialist
Center for Renewable Carbon

renewablecarbon.tennessee.edu

The University of Tennessee
Institute of Agriculture
Center for Renewable Carbon
Mail: 2506 Jacob Drive
865-946-1162 (o)
865-946-1109 (f)
tjessel@utk.edu

FiberAnalytics Map Plans?

Hi Jessica,

I was hired to help out the IBSS project with web content at se-ibss.org.

I’m wondering if you’re continuing development of the Biomass GIS system:

http://gismap.oit.ncsu.edu/FiberAnalytics_ResourceAtlas.html

I’m curious about any future plans for the app.

Thanks,

Tanner

Tanner M. Jessel
Information Technology Specialist
Center for Renewable Carbon

renewablecarbon.tennessee.edu

The University of Tennessee
Institute of Agriculture
Center for Renewable Carbon
Mail: 2506 Jacob Drive
865-946-1162 (o)
865-946-1109 (f)
tjessel@utk.edu

Work on Biomass Misconceptions?

Hi Leslie and Bill,

I am wondering, has there been a discussion among the AFRI-CAP grantees common misconceptions about biomass?

There’s so much misinformation out there, it seems overwhelming.

I’m just now thinking it might be a good concerted social media campaign to counter top misconceptions.

Maybe using #BiomassMyth or something like that, similar to the #BiomassWins hashtag we’ve already discussed.

As an example of a resource that might not be reflecting reality:

http://www.dogwoodalliance.org/campaigns/bioenergy/ and <http://www.dogwoodalliance.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Whole-Tree-Wood-Pellet-Production-Report.pdf>, which is essentially saying "pellet plants are using whole trees," with a white paper with photo evidence of whole log chipping.

Maybe. There’s nothing stopping them – although even as a forestry outsider it’s hard to imagine any markets where it makes economic sense to chip up whole logs for pellets.

At any rate, this industry web site FAQ counters: what looks like whole logs in photos are actually the unmarketable tops of trees harvested for timber <http://www.envivabiomass.com/faq-most-frequently-asked/#whole>.

I also see this come up as a popular example of renewable misconceptions: "Ethanol tears up your engine."

In rebuttal, Renewable Fuels Alliance has this "Ethanol Facts" section:

http://www.ethanolrfa.org/pages/ethanol-facts-engine-performance

I just wrote you about how CenUSA is using an "ask" site with eXtension.

I also see we have a special "Wood Energy" board from Ask.extension.org:

https://ask.extension.org/groups/1703

Only two questions on it at the moment – which leads me to wonder:

Do we have a list of "top misconceptions about forest bioenergy" that we could post to the forum as FAQs, get them answered, and then maybe embed the questions/answers on the SE-IBSS site with a widget or some other web service? (I don’t know what options are available right now).

If embedding is not possible, another option might be to just post the misconceptions to social media, with a link to the collection on eXtension.

One area of outreach I’ve considered might be memes… one of my favorites is "Philosoraptor."

"Philosoraptor" is one of several "advice animals" who is "deeply immersed in metaphysical inquiries or unraveling quirky paradoxes," at least according to http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/philosoraptor.

Here’s an example:

"If ethanol is bad for car engines, why did the T run on ethanol?"

Or "Why do stock cars burn ethanol?"

We can easily generate memes here:

http://memegenerator.net/Philosoraptor/caption

Example:

The "common misconceptions" might lend well to being illustrated with a series of memes.

Anyway, just wondering if you know if there’s anything out there about biomass myths that IBSS can address.

If not, I’d be interested in seeing about collecting some of the "top biomass myths."

Thanks,

Tanner

Tanner M. Jessel
Information Technology Specialist
Center for Renewable Carbon

renewablecarbon.tennessee.edu

The University of Tennessee
Institute of Agriculture
Center for Renewable Carbon
Mail: 2506 Jacob Drive
865-946-1162 (o)
865-946-1109 (f)
tjessel@utk.edu