Query re: honeysuckle, kudzu on First Creek at Caswell Park

Hi Lori,

I am interested in visiting the First Creek site on Saturday, April 4 to cull the non-native Japanese honeysuckle bushes.

What I think I will do is just prune them down to about knee height and get the trimmings out of the way, most likely into compact (6 ft x 6 ft) brush piles that benefit wildlife.

If it doesn’t take long to knock down the honeysuckle bushes, I’ll also work on any privet that might be down there.

My thinking is by coppicing the vegetation at knee height, this will leave plenty of room to potentially use weed pullers with creek cleanup volunteers the following weekend (April 11).

My priority is honeysuckle bushes because they take up the most space at ground level and I want to make it easy for volunteers to move around during the April 11 event.

As of this moment I have not asked anyone to join me, but I can imagine recruiting at least one or two individuals to assist (it may end up just my brother-in-law and sister or other individuals I can conscript in to helping me).

Anything else needed on this plan?

Thanks,

Tanner

On Tue, Mar 24, 2015 at 5:57 PM, Lori Goerlich <LGoerlich> wrote:

Tanner, you just need to coordinate with the parks and rec department. We regularly coordinate with and support various volunteer groups that would like to remove trash, or invasive species from parks and greenway corridors. Just get with myself and Joe on details. Like when and how many people. We have some weed pullers we lend out from time to time to responsible individuals, so you might want to take advantage of that as well. Thank you for your interest! Lori

Sent from L. Goerlich iPhone 4S

> On Mar 24, 2015, at 2:58 PM, Tanner Jessel <mountainsol> wrote:
>
> Hi David, Kasey, and Lori,
>
> I’m not an expert on trees, but my ecologist’s eye takes note of a thicket of invasive honeysuckle bushes, mimosa trees, and kudzu along First Creek. No doubt privet is in the mix too.
>
> I’m inclined to take a 13 inch pruning saw and see how many honeysuckle bushes I can trim out by hand before they fully bud out for the summer.
>
> However, I can easily imagine calls to KPD from concerned park goers about a strange person in the park cutting out shrubs along the creek.
>
> I also imagine there are liability concerns for the City of Knoxville regarding individuals using cutting tools on city-owned property.
>
> Can you advise me on whom I should speak with concerning what might possible for an individual or perhaps a small group to undertake in terms of cutting back some of the non-native, invasive plants by hand?
>
> My hope is that park visitors can more easily see (and appreciate) First Creek, and that there’d be an opportunity for native vegetation to take hold.
>
> Anyway, I thought the three of you would be a good starting point for learning whom I might talk to about what’s possible. Any ideas?
>
> Thanks for any pointers,
>
> Tanner
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About Tanner Jessel

I am a recent M.S. in Information Science graduate from the University of Tennessee School of Information Science. I was formerly a graduate research assistant funded by DataONE (Data Observation Network for Earth). Prior, I worked for four years as a content lead and biodiversity scientist with the U.S. Geological Survey's Biodiversity Informatics Program. Building on my work experience in biodiversity and environmental informatics, my work with DataONE focused on exploring the nature of scientific collaborations necessary for scientific inquiry. I also conducted research concerning user experience and usability, and assisted in development of member nodes with an emphasis on spatial data and infrastructure. I assisted with research designed to understand sociocultural issues within collaborative research communities. Through August 1, 2014, I was based at the Center for Information and Communication Studies at the University of Tennessee School of Information Science in Knoxville, Tennessee.

Posted on April 2, 2015, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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