Meeting notes and habitat blogs

Hi All,

On our last call we talked about publishing the core posts privately for our group (we actually said I’d post these last Sunday – then I spilled aquarium water on my modem… so here we are today. D’oh).

I just "privately published" a main page – sadly I don’t think giving you the link lets you see it:

https://separc.wordpress.com/products/yard-herping-landscaped-habitats-for-reptiles-amphibians/

Without loading the page, note that the URL puts it as a top-level page, in the same area as other "products," see?

Also note we have a "products" section on our separc.org site:

http://www.separc.org/products

However, while eventually we’ll list this new product as a "product" on separc.org (for example, "buyer’s guide to pet reptiles at <http://www.separc.org/products/buyer-s-guide-to-pet-reptiles>) the separc.wordpress.com blog is definitely the permanent home for the whole product. I think my motive in pointing this out is it’s different from how our other task teams work.

I learned tonight that printing a PDF doesn’t look that much different from a word document, at least not the way Chrome on a Mac is letting me print as PDF. Nonetheless, I have attached a PDF printout (see attached).

Also by the way… I edited this intro post a lot, mainly because I envision it as a "splash" or "landing" page providing access points to the whole series, rather than serving as individual blog entry or first post in a series.

We could do it that way (a series) with the "splash" page on http://www.separc.org/products, with a new sub-page under "products" and then a link to the collection of posts (we may have talked about this already):

https://separc.wordpress.com/category/education-outreach-task-team/

But instead of that URL it’d be like

https://separc.wordpress.com/category/yard-herping-landscaped-habitats-for-reptiles-amphibians/

Or whatever other name for the category we might want.

Also note my edits have increased the post from 461 to 931 words.

I think because I’m seeing it as a "splash" or "landing" page explaining what’s going on with the whole project, that’s OK.

Part of the ballooning word count is I tried to use some of the "storytelling" part of Kimberly Terrell’s SEPARC 2015 Social Media workshop talk: did some wordsmithing like "nature’s benefits" and adding a bit about how we all "grew up as children looking for reptiles and amphibians." I also added a mention about how snakes may visit, but just want to be left alone, and a note about pets and children and snakes (with a promise of tips on a "no snake" zone – possible future blog topic). For now, the text "Yes, even snakes – don’t be scared!) aren’t creepy" serves as an internal "anchor" that jumps to the section "What about Snakes in the Yard." That actually might even be an actual separate blog post, which would cut down on the overall word count.

My additions to the "snakes" section were from a feeling that it needed some extra details – I do think there’s a need to sell the story to even skeptics… or at least encourage them not to bash in a harmless corn snake’s head?

Hope ya’ll don’t mind my penchant for words… I do not expect to make much in the way of additions to the remaining posts, because I do believe actual blog entries should be short (even though I myself am verbose).

I’ll work on the others Monday. The "post" versus "landing page" topic may become more clear with the other core pages up.

-Tanner

On Thu, Apr 2, 2015 at 2:49 PM, Andrea Drayer <andrea.drayer> wrote:

Hi everyone,

First, I would like to apologize for missing the call. I had a space cadet moment and had thought the call was on Tuesday at 11:00 instead of Monday. Brian’s notes on the call are attached to this email.

Second, since the backyard habitat project started with the Steering committee, we would appreciate your input on what we have accomplished so far.

What we need from you:

1. Edits of our products that we have currently finished (attached) – send to me when finished.

2. Pictures of you or your children helping to construct some of these features in your own backyard. They don’t have to be exactly what we have outlined, just what works for your backyard. I have attached a picture of what I created in my backyard a few weekends ago. Pictures of the process will be helpful!

3. Pictures of you or your children looking for and finding backyard herps

Blog post structure:

I have attached the word files for the blog posts associated with the project. We have set it up to have 4 types of posts that will all be linked:

1. one intro blog post
2. 3 main blog posts that will be linked to the main summary blog
3. an observation guide (we are currently tackling this)
4. mini blog posts also off of the intro (toad abodes, pvc pipes for treefrogs, benefits of snakes, etc.).

We are also still working on the mini posts, although the toad abode post and the Snakes why did it have to be snakes! post is attached.

Thank you! The education task team greatly appreciates your help with this.

-Andrea

Yard Herping_ Landscaped Habitats for Reptiles & Amphibians _ Southeast Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation (SEPARC).pdf

Habitat-blog-intro-tjedit.docx

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About Tanner Jessel

I am a recent M.S. in Information Science graduate from the University of Tennessee School of Information Science. I was formerly a graduate research assistant funded by DataONE (Data Observation Network for Earth). Prior, I worked for four years as a content lead and biodiversity scientist with the U.S. Geological Survey's Biodiversity Informatics Program. Building on my work experience in biodiversity and environmental informatics, my work with DataONE focused on exploring the nature of scientific collaborations necessary for scientific inquiry. I also conducted research concerning user experience and usability, and assisted in development of member nodes with an emphasis on spatial data and infrastructure. I assisted with research designed to understand sociocultural issues within collaborative research communities. Through August 1, 2014, I was based at the Center for Information and Communication Studies at the University of Tennessee School of Information Science in Knoxville, Tennessee.

Posted on April 6, 2015, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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