DLIA Website Taxonomy Initial Impressions

Hi Todd,

To get going with reviewing the DLIA web site, here are a few initial thoughts on taxonomy for the site:

On the header:

DLIA should be changed to "About Us

"About Us" should be moved to the immediate right of "Home""About Us" Page (currently "DLIA")

Change "Science & Research" to "Science"

Change "Communications" to "Outreach"

Move "Presentations" from "Events" to "Outreach"

"Internships" should be moved from the top black menu bar to the lower "Education" menu bar.

"Photo Galleries" should not be used at all. Instead, a social photo service like Flickr should be used. This new service should be moved to "Outreach" along with the other social media (e.g., YouTube Channel)

For that matter, all social media accounts (e.g., Facebook and Twitter etc) should be featured under a "Get Social" tab on "Outreach" (currently "Communications").

FAQs should be moved from the top black menu bar to "About Us" (currently "DLIA" on the lower "gold" menu bar).

Change "2014 Events" under "Events" to "Special Events" (Really any DLIA event is special, right?)

Change "ATBI Conferences" to "Annual Conference"

Move "15 years of discovery" to "About Us" (currently "DLIA").

This publication is something I need to work on. I am not a fan of PDF documents. In particular, I would like to create a "Story Map" using ESRI The content "Great Stories of Discovery" is particularly well-suited to the "Story Map" format, although I’d need to seek out more detail for where exactly these "stories of discovery" took place.

Publications should be moved from "Communications" to "Science" (currently "Science & Research")

"Featured Critters" should not be on the main header.

  • It might be appropriate in "Outreach" (currently "Communications")
  • "Critters" should be avoided as it is the name of a 1980s horror film series
  • "Biota" is a more appropriate, less psychologically loaded term

This is really just a rough sketch from an information architecture perspective, and user experience perspective.

Most of what I’m saying is coming from a perspective of making things easier on the user.

For example, I’m not particularly opposed to "Featured Critters" and I think it’s kind of neat.

But I subscribe to the notion that "less said is best said" and the more streamlined a product we can present to potential site visitors, the more enjoyable their experience will be.

Actually I did not even noticed the information at the very top of the page – "About Us," "Internships," "Photo Galleries," "Faqs," and "Log In"

The step I really need to do is make a site inventory / site map.

That will help catch redundancies like where I suggest "DLIA" should be changed to "About Us" when there is already an "About Us" on the top black menu bar.

I’m also hoping none of these changes will necessarily change the URL (For example, changing "Science & Research" at <http://www.dlia.org/science-and-research> won’t necessarily change the URL to "<http://www.dlia.org/science>."

I realize I’ve written everything like "this should happen" but it’s all open to discussion and reflection.

Thanks,

Tanner

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About Tanner Jessel

I am a recent M.S. in Information Science graduate from the University of Tennessee School of Information Science. I was formerly a graduate research assistant funded by DataONE (Data Observation Network for Earth). Prior, I worked for four years as a content lead and biodiversity scientist with the U.S. Geological Survey's Biodiversity Informatics Program. Building on my work experience in biodiversity and environmental informatics, my work with DataONE focused on exploring the nature of scientific collaborations necessary for scientific inquiry. I also conducted research concerning user experience and usability, and assisted in development of member nodes with an emphasis on spatial data and infrastructure. I assisted with research designed to understand sociocultural issues within collaborative research communities. Through August 1, 2014, I was based at the Center for Information and Communication Studies at the University of Tennessee School of Information Science in Knoxville, Tennessee.

Posted on June 19, 2015, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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