Monthly Archives: December 2016

edgewoodparkcityh1@gmail.com

Hi Calvin and Jennifer,

Is one of you the owner of the gmail address edgewoodparkcityh1@gmail.com

Or is that Kaye?

The reason I ask is I would like to use it for a project I have in mind (can be discussed with PCO board, naturally).

The idea is as follows:

I have my own wordpress site and chiefly create new blog posts on it using the "post via e-mail" feature. Meaning, the blog has its own e-mail address, and when I want to publish something, I just Blind Carbon Copy my blog.

I would like to activate the "secret post via e-mail feature" on the PCO blog, then use the edgewoodparkcityh1 to e-mail the PCO wordpress site the info I have collected on homes in the existing and proposed H1 overlay (when I am done with the whole shebang, likely next week).

My goal is to create one draft e-mail per property, then be sure the drafts are ordered correctly, and send each e-mail in order to the "secret address" for the PCO wordpress blog.

The idea I have is you will end up with one blog post per property that a user could navigate through by street, or just in order of posting.

The title of each post would reflect the address of each property, such as "1701 WASHINGTON AVE"

The content of each post would be a recent photo of the structure, the tabular data for the property (year built and value), and for the select properties that are in the 1993 National Register study, the narrative from the NPS continuation sheet (e.g., "Queen Anne. (c. 1910) gabled roof with 6 over one windows.")

Assuming I complete every post in January, you would end up with a link on the PCO home page similar to this one:

https://parkridgecommunity.wordpress.com/2014/08/

But instead of 2014/08 you would end up with 2017/01 and the URL will be something like "1701-washington-ave" instead of what we see below for the single blog post we have:

https://parkridgecommunity.wordpress.com/2014/08/01/meeting-reminder-vote-on-bylaws-and-pco-house-sale/.

Maybe it’s the archivist in me, but I would like to use the e-mail address (someone, not me) created for the project:

edgewoodparkcityh1@gmail.com

I like this because preserves all the outgoing messages in a commonly accessed e-mail account that is relevant to the project.

Anyway this is what I’m thinking.

I would also really like to get my hand on any original photos of properties taken by MPC for the (1996?) local overlay study, to include in the blog posts for each individual property.

-Tanner

12-21-2016 Research Notes

https://www.fs.usda.gov/rds/archive/SubmittingData

Associated publication(s) or a link to them if available online

http://www.handle.net/prefix.html

Field measurements of ground, surface, ladder, and crown fuels 2-32 years following Dendroctonus ponderosae epidemics in the Pinus contorta zone of south-central Oregon

http://api.crossref.org/prefixes/10.2737/works?query=global+state&filter=has-orcid:true&rows=1

http://api.crossref.org/prefixes/10.2737/works?query=global+state&filter=has-orcid:false&rows=1

http://api.crossref.org/prefixes/10.2737/works?query=global+state&filter=has-orcid:false&rows=999

http://dx.doi.org/10.2737/pnw-gtr-400

Is the limit on the rows per page 999?

I just tried this:

http://api.crossref.org/prefixes/10.2737/works?query=global+state&filter=has-orcid:false&rows=999

Also tried this:

http://api.crossref.org/members/1450/works?query=global+state&filter=has-orcid:false&rows=999

But earlier when I looked at this:

http://api.crossref.org/prefixes/10.2737/works

I can see that there should be 3008 results… again odd since “Research Data Archive” supposedly has just 270 datasets.

USDA Forest Service

From: Geoffrey Bilder [mailto:gbilder [ a t ]crossref.org]

Sent: Wednesday, December 21, 2016 12:41 PM

To: Jessel, Tanner – FS <tjessel [ a t ] fs.fed.us>

Subject: Re: How to get USDA Forest Service R&D a DOI?

The number you quote is interesting for two reasons:

1) RDS supposedly has only 247 datasets

2) R&D has 47,725 publications in Treesearch (https://www.treesearch.fs.fed.us/)

Interesting.

Do you know if there is a tool where I can explore items under that 10.273 code?

Yes- our REST API. See documentation at http://api.crossref.org.

(by the way – is there an official word for that part of a DOI? I’ve always just said “it’s the unique identifier for the publisher” but I suspect there is a more precise name?)

It is called the "prefix.| It isn’t the identifier for the publisher- it is just the namespace under which the DOI was generated. When journals change publishers existing DOIs do not change prefixes (hence that "persistence " word). There is an actual Crossref member ID as well. In the case of USDA Forest Service it is 1450. So you can start to see the metadata for the publications by looking at:

http://api.crossref.org/members/1450/works

You can also search using a UI at http://search.crossref.org

The total items with a DOI that you quoted (over 10K) makes me suspect some of our PNW publications *might* have a DOI already assigned, and PNW Research Station is as yet unaware of the existence of those DOIs.

That sounds likely. Should be easy to use the API to automatically look them up.

The Pacific Northwest Research Station has 929 publications of the type “General Technical Report” (see link below):

https://www.treesearch.fs.fed.us/search.php?in_words_phrases=&in_author=&in_title=&filterByDate=&in_pub_year_start=2006&in_pub_year_end=2017&in_station_id=PNW&in_pub_type_id=3&in_pub_vol

So your instincts are correct. The first item listed in the above is "Community biomass handbook. Volume 3: How wood energy is revitalizing rural Alaska".

If you look in Crossref Metadata Search- volumes 1 & 2 of that same title have DOIs (though they are not shown on the landing page), but it looks like Volume 3 does not.

One last question – do you happen to have a contact on your end for who to get in touch with associated with the 10.273 code?

Send email to support [ a t ] crossref.org and they should be able to get you the names of our contacts. Note that, as it is the holidays, they may be slow to respond to non-urgent requests.

Cheers,

–G

http://api.crossref.org/members/1450/works?query=pacific+northwest&filter=has-orcid:true&rows=999

http://dx.doi.org/10.2737/nrs-rn-243

https://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/pubs/52403

http://orcid.org/0000-0002-1062-6010

Brett J. Butler

http://orcid.org/0000-0002-2465-7993

Created: 2015-06-10

http://api.crossref.org/members/1450/works?query=pacific+northwest&filter=has-orcid:true&rows=999

http://api.crossref.org/members/1450/works?query=forest&filter=has-orcid:true&rows=999

41 results

82 matches

https://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/people/bbutler01

http://dx.doi.org/10.2737/NRS-RN-210

http://dx.doi.org/10.2737/NRS-RN-215

http://dx.doi.org/10.2737/NRS-RN-217

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ORCID and DOI in NRS library?

Hi Brett,

I am a post-masters research participant in science communications with the PNW Research Station.

We recently had a PNW station scientist inquire about Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID).

I noticed that you have an ORCID at http://orcid.org/0000-0002-2465-7993.

I was wondering if you could share what motivated you to sign up for one?

Also, I have noticed on your NRS profile at < https://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/people/bbutler01> you have 42 documents using a Digital Object Identifier (DOI).

Here are some representative works of yours that caught my attention:

http://dx.doi.org/10.2737/NRS-RN-208

http://dx.doi.org/10.2737/NRS-RN-209

http://dx.doi.org/10.2737/NRS-RN-210

http://dx.doi.org/10.2737/NRS-RN-211

I’m trying to understand how researchers with PNW RS might obtain a DOI for their works (Like GTR, NRS, etc.) that are not published in journals.

I was hoping you might be able to inform me if you were personally obtaining the DOI for your works, or if someone (or something) else create the DOIs for you?

Any information you have would be helpful.

Thanks,

Tanner

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How to get USDA Forest Service R&D a DOI?

Geoff-

Thanks for pointing this out.

The number you quote is interesting for two reasons:

1) RDS supposedly has only 247 datasets

2) R&D has 47,725 publications in Treesearch (https://www.treesearch.fs.fed.us/)

Do you know if there is a tool where I can explore items under that 10.273 code? (by the way – is there an official word for that part of a DOI? I’ve always just said “it’s the unique identifier for the publisher” but I suspect there is a more precise name?)

What I mean by “a tool where I can explore items” is something like this tool: http://chronograph.labs.crossref.org/

The reason I ask is I am wondering if it is possible for me to examine the full range of items and know if any PNW in-house publications have a DOI that we at PNW simply don’t know about.

The total items with a DOI that you quoted (over 10K) makes me suspect some of our PNW publications *might* have a DOI already assigned, and PNW Research Station is as yet unaware of the existence of those DOIs.

(FS is a large enough organization that sometimes we don’t know what’s going on in other divisions.)

Here is an example of why I’m asking:

The Pacific Northwest Research Station has 929 publications of the type “General Technical Report” (see link below):

https://www.treesearch.fs.fed.us/search.php?in_words_phrases=&in_author=&in_title=&filterByDate=&in_pub_year_start=2006&in_pub_year_end=2017&in_station_id=PNW&in_pub_type_id=3&in_pub_vol

To my knowledge, none of these items have DOIs assigned, although I feel strongly they ought to have one.

So, PNW either needs to match our publications with their existing DOI (that we are unaware of), or we need to retroactively assign DOIs post publication for these 929 items.

One last question – do you happen to have a contact on your end for who to get in touch with associated with the 10.273 code?

Thanks,

Tanner

From: Geoffrey Bilder [mailto:gbilder [ a t ] crossref.org]
Sent: Wednesday, December 21, 2016 1:51 AM
To: Jessel, Tanner – FS <tjessel [ a t ]fs.fed.us>
Subject: Re: How to get USDA Forest Service R&D a DOI?

Hi Tanner. Good to hear from you. It looks like the USDA Forest service R&D is already a Crossref member and has assigned over 10K DOIs (including to data). See, for example:

https://doi.org/10.2737/rds-2015-0048

So it looks like you should be good to go.

Let me know if you have any questions.

Cheers,

–G

On Tue, Dec 20, 2016 at 10:55 PM, Jessel, Tanner – FS <tjessel [ a t ] fs.fed.us> wrote:

Geoff,

Tanner here – you and I know each other from working on DataONE together.

I’m currently working a post-masters research fellowship in science communication with the U.S. Forest Service Research and Development program’s Pacific Northwest Research Station.

FS R&D is the largest forestry R&D organization in the world and we do quite a lot of in-house publications for materials that never go into a traditional academic publications – publishing is often done in-house for things like “general technical reports” or “research notes” or datasets.

There’s growing awareness we need to be assigning DOI’s to datasets and publications that don’t appear in academic journals.

I wonder if you could point me in the right direction for how to get USDA Forest Service R&D on the road to assigning DOI’s (or other form of persistent identifier)?

Is Crossref an RA that would create a unique “publisher” identifier for R&D as a whole, based on a subscription relationship?

Would the first step be here?

http://www.crossref.org/join_crossref.html

Also, do you happen to know if a U.S. Dept. of Agriculture or Forest Service organization has already established a relationship with CrossRef?

Thanks,

Tanner

Tanner Jessel, MSIS
Science Communications Research Fellow
Forest Service

Pacific Northwest Research Station

p: 503-808-2108
f: 503-808-2130
tjessel [ a t ] fs.fed.us
1220 SW 3rd Ave, Suite 1400
Portland, OR 97207
www.fs.fed.us
Caring for the land and serving people

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How to get USDA Forest Service R&D a DOI?

Geoff,

Tanner here – you and I know each other from working on DataONE together.

I’m currently working a post-masters research fellowship in science communication with the U.S. Forest Service Research and Development program’s Pacific Northwest Research Station.

FS R&D is the largest forestry R&D organization in the world and we do quite a lot of in-house publications for materials that never go into a traditional academic publications – publishing is often done in-house for things like “general technical reports” or “research notes” or datasets.

There’s growing awareness we need to be assigning DOI’s to datasets and publications that don’t appear in academic journals.

I wonder if you could point me in the right direction for how to get USDA Forest Service R&D on the road to assigning DOI’s (or other form of persistent identifier)?

Is Crossref an RA that would create a unique “publisher” identifier for R&D as a whole, based on a subscription relationship?

Would the first step be here?

http://www.crossref.org/join_crossref.html

Also, do you happen to know if a U.S. Dept. of Agriculture or Forest Service organization has already established a relationship with CrossRef?

Thanks,

Tanner

Tanner Jessel, MSIS
Science Communications Research Fellow
Forest Service

Pacific Northwest Research Station

p: 503-808-2108
f: 503-808-2130
tjessel
1220 SW 3rd Ave, Suite 1400
Portland, OR 97207
www.fs.fed.us
Caring for the land and serving people

This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

Open Researcher and Contributor Id (ORCID)

Hi Dede,

I heard from Rhonda Mazza, who heard on an SMT meeting that you need an ORCID ID to publish in a particular journal.

Among other reasons to be interested in this, I think this could be important for the Author’s guide.

Could you share more details about what journal you were hoping to publish in, and what the requirements were surrounding registration for an Open Researcher and Contributor ID?

Thanks,

Tanner

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PARC / SEPARC / PARCA dataset gallery on SALCC DataBasin?

Hilary,

I am looking for an image of PARCAs for a blog post about the upcoming CPA meeting.

I looked here: https://salcc.databasin.org/galleries/featured#page=1

And it gave me a thought:

Could SALCC possibly collect all the relevant reptile & amphibian layers into a new SALCC CPA DataBasin gallery?

I noticed there is a gallery for datasets relevant to SARP:
https://salcc.databasin.org/galleries/6ba887ce2ec34e96aa2299df0c138fb2

Perhaps there could also be a gallery for datasets relevant to SEPARC / PARC / PARCAs?

JJ (cc’d on this message) would know better what datasets would belong in such a gallery, but some CPA datasets that might be appropriate for a SEPARC / PARC gallery on the SALCC implementation of DataBasin look to possibly be:

Eastern Diamondback Connectivity
Pine Snake Connectivity
Timber Rattlesnake Connectivity

Indicator V 2.1: Forested Wetland – Amphibians
Indicator V 2.1: Pine & Prairie – Amphibians

Draft Indicator: Index of pine woodland, savanna, and prairie amphibians – old
Indicator V 2.0: Forested Wetland – Forested Wetland Amphibians
Indicator V 2.0: Pine & Prairie – Pine and Prairie Amphibians

Indicator V 2.1: Landscapes – Low Road Density
Indicator V 2.0: Landscapes – Low Road Density
Forested Wetland: Ecosystem Score V 2.1
Forested Wetland: Ecosystem Integrity – Blueprint 2.0

By the way, this link did not appear to be working when I looked at it:

http://www.southatlanticlcc.org/project/priority-amphibian-and-reptile-conservation-areas-for-the-south-atlantic/

Thanks,

Tanner

Open Researcher and Contributor Id (ORCID)

Rhonda,

Nice job catching an interesting idea from your call.

I’ve heard of ORCID and the question you raised interested me as well, so I looked on their web site a bit and found this on “how to tell if your researchers are using ORCID”

https://members.orcid.org/finding-orcid-record-holders-your-institution

One of the tips is to look by DOI, which I know sometimes TreeSearch provides.

So, I searched for two terms:

(1) DOI

(2) doi

I limited the search to those within station: PNW (PNW has 5,117 publications).

DOI – 80 items

Doi: – 59 items

So, one could hypothetically pull the DOI for various PNW pubs as a list of 59 – 80 items (assuming TreeSearch really found all records w/ DOI listed).

Example:

10.1111/gcb.13275

I get a bit less clear on how this works, but I think if the DOI is in the ORCID system, you should then be able to sue the API to query the ORCID database:

https://pub.sandbox.orcid.org/v1.2/search/orcid-bio/?digital-object-ids:"10.1111/gcb.13275"

And you would ideally be able to find PNW researchers using ORCID.

I’m just writing this down to poke at more later because it interests me to know if any PNW researchers currently use ORCID.

-Tanner

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Lit Cited Pointers, Examples

All,

I have completed the “Table” layout (that I had promised to do last week, by Friday – sorry for the delay).

I initially thought that comparing the FS Library Guide to our own Author’s Guide would show us what we are missing that they have.

What I learned is that the FS Library basically copied our Author’s Guide verbatim.

So, I learned less than I expected to learn.

However, I took the FS Library citation document example citations and put them into “column B” of the attached spreadsheet, with the relevant “pointers” from the PNW Author’s Guide in the corresponding row in Column A.

Since this is in table form it should be easy to add other types of media (we need to do an example dataset, I think).

I have another document that shows all the data types in Zotero (attached word document) that I might add to this spreadsheet at some point.

I also thought this “table layout” might be something to try in the Author’s Guide, instead of the current layout.

I happen to prefer the layout because it puts the “pointers” right next to the “example,” but that’s just me.

-Tanner

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Transposed-FS-Library-Citation-Guide.xlsx

Example-citations-by-type.docx

Call for Topics for 12/15 R&D PAO Call

Hi Jennifer,

Tanner here with PNW Research Station. I’m here for a couple more months as an ORISE Fellow.

I have some experience with managing social media and want to pass on some tips I’ve picked up over the years.

I just followed “fsresearch” on my personal Facebook

Tip 1:

Encourage Facebook followers to choose the “see first” option from the “Following” drop-down menu.

This can be done with a screen capture video, or a photo that highlights the “see first” feature. Lots of FB users don’t know about this, and if they don’t select “See First,” your valuable content will get drowned out in your follower’s timeline.

Tip 2:

I noticed two recent posts give shout-outs to other organizations.

When making a post that calls out another organization, be sure to tag them.

For example, instead of just typing “American Psychological Association,” in the December 14, 2016 post at 9:37 am, instead start typing, @American Psy… and then select the “official” page that pops up (https://www.facebook.com/AmericanPsychologicalAssociation/)

This tag lets the other organization know you’re talking about them, and the other social media manager may say, “hey, this is good original content for me to share,” and they then share it to their followers, gaining FS R&D greater exposure.

Same deal for the recent “Oak Ridge National Lab” post at 9:57 am – a good opportunity to ping Oak Ridge National Laboratory (https://www.facebook.com/Oak.Ridge.National.Laboratory)

In general, it’s a good idea to check for the opportunity to tag when you’re doing a shout-out. Even USDA can be tagged – who knows, their social media manager might decide your content is worth sharing with their ~297,000 followers.

Besides being good overall social media strategy, it’s also a service to your readers who might be interested in following the other organizations you’re calling out.

Finally – not so much of a tip to share as a potential discussion topic –

Yasmeen, Cindy Miner and I have recently discussed an interesting case study that has come up regarding use of Flickr as an image management platform for our scientists.

Here’s my open research notebook capture of that conversation:

https://mountainsol.wordpress.com/2016/11/18/flickr-case-study-c-harringtons-yellow-cedar/

Yasmeen and I have talked about this being something that might be worth talking about with the R&D PAO call.

Thanks,

Tanner

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