Call for Topics for 12/15 R&D PAO Call

Hi Jennifer,

Tanner here with PNW Research Station. I’m here for a couple more months as an ORISE Fellow.

I have some experience with managing social media and want to pass on some tips I’ve picked up over the years.

I just followed “fsresearch” on my personal Facebook

Tip 1:

Encourage Facebook followers to choose the “see first” option from the “Following” drop-down menu.

This can be done with a screen capture video, or a photo that highlights the “see first” feature. Lots of FB users don’t know about this, and if they don’t select “See First,” your valuable content will get drowned out in your follower’s timeline.

Tip 2:

I noticed two recent posts give shout-outs to other organizations.

When making a post that calls out another organization, be sure to tag them.

For example, instead of just typing “American Psychological Association,” in the December 14, 2016 post at 9:37 am, instead start typing, @American Psy… and then select the “official” page that pops up (https://www.facebook.com/AmericanPsychologicalAssociation/)

This tag lets the other organization know you’re talking about them, and the other social media manager may say, “hey, this is good original content for me to share,” and they then share it to their followers, gaining FS R&D greater exposure.

Same deal for the recent “Oak Ridge National Lab” post at 9:57 am – a good opportunity to ping Oak Ridge National Laboratory (https://www.facebook.com/Oak.Ridge.National.Laboratory)

In general, it’s a good idea to check for the opportunity to tag when you’re doing a shout-out. Even USDA can be tagged – who knows, their social media manager might decide your content is worth sharing with their ~297,000 followers.

Besides being good overall social media strategy, it’s also a service to your readers who might be interested in following the other organizations you’re calling out.

Finally – not so much of a tip to share as a potential discussion topic –

Yasmeen, Cindy Miner and I have recently discussed an interesting case study that has come up regarding use of Flickr as an image management platform for our scientists.

Here’s my open research notebook capture of that conversation:

https://mountainsol.wordpress.com/2016/11/18/flickr-case-study-c-harringtons-yellow-cedar/

Yasmeen and I have talked about this being something that might be worth talking about with the R&D PAO call.

Thanks,

Tanner

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About Tanner Jessel

I am a recent M.S. in Information Science graduate from the University of Tennessee School of Information Science. I was formerly a graduate research assistant funded by DataONE (Data Observation Network for Earth). Prior, I worked for four years as a content lead and biodiversity scientist with the U.S. Geological Survey's Biodiversity Informatics Program. Building on my work experience in biodiversity and environmental informatics, my work with DataONE focused on exploring the nature of scientific collaborations necessary for scientific inquiry. I also conducted research concerning user experience and usability, and assisted in development of member nodes with an emphasis on spatial data and infrastructure. I assisted with research designed to understand sociocultural issues within collaborative research communities. Through August 1, 2014, I was based at the Center for Information and Communication Studies at the University of Tennessee School of Information Science in Knoxville, Tennessee.

Posted on December 14, 2016, in Uncategorized, USFS Research. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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